This is Brooks Pierce

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For Elizabeth Spainhour, a career in law was out of the question. “Practicing law is what the Spainhours do,” she said, referring to her father, a judge, and two brothers, also fellow attorneys. “Naturally, I wanted to do something else.”

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A few years ago, as her daughter prepared to get a driver's license, Libby Brewington did what any risk-minded attorney would do: she drew up a contract.

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Walt Tippett has been a commercial litigator and business lawyer in his native eastern North Carolina for almost twenty years, but he got his start 4,000 miles away—standing in the lobby of a London barrister’s chambers wearing boots, old jeans, and a borrowed, three-sizes-too-small sport jacket that fit him like a coat of paint.

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Though government entities have the right to purchase private land for public use, landowners have the right to just compensation. When the North Carolina Department of Transportation ("NCDOT") changed the route of the Wilmington Bypass to run through the center of the property that'd been in their family since the 1800s, Dr. Joseph Goodman and his sister disagreed with the Department's valuation.

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When you ask what drew her to practice education law, Jill Wilson cites her family of educators (both parents and her two sisters) who gave her a deep appreciation for “education as the answer for so many things society needs.”

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Wade Hargrove’s affinity for the media and broadcast industries has its roots in his childhood. As a sixth grader, Wade and two buddies bought a weekly 30-minute time slot on the local AM radio station, WRRZ in Clinton. They provided the programming themselves—a live, in-studio performance featuring their own country music band, with Wade playing pedal steel guitar and harmonica. They made the venture pay by selling ads to local businesses for 50 cents a piece.

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The North Carolina Bar Association recognized Greensboro attorney W. Erwin Fuller, Jr. with its Citizen Lawyer Award in 2011. The award honors attorneys who provide exemplary public service to their communities.

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If Arty’s appreciation for traditional pursuits like cooking, growing vegetables and college football lead you to believe he’s behind the curve when it comes to leading edge technology and connectivity, think again. Arty (@HABolickII) uses the social networking tool Twitter to send clients, colleagues and other construction law contacts a steady stream of articles about everything from indemnification clauses to subconsultant contracts. Every document for each of Arty’s matters is stored electronically in a secure, virtual file cabinet he can access from anywhere he can connect to the Internet. “My entire practice goes with me wherever I travel,” Arty explains. “Construction law requires a lot of road time—working at job sites and meeting clients who expect their attorney to come to them."  But don’t mistake Arty for a gadget-obsessed techno junkie. “Clients don’t think of me as a ‘techie,’ they think of me as accessible,” he says.

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Bob will tell you that practicing law is what he does for a living; soccer and coaching are what he loves. In reality, though, he approaches his profession and his passion in much the same way.

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Business North Carolina magazine publishes annually the "Legal Elite" - lawyers throughout the state rated the best in their fields. In 2010, Jennifer K. Van Zant attained the highest number of votes in Antitrust Law, earning her a spot in the Legal Elite Hall of Fame.

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Business North Carolina magazine publishes annually the "Legal Elite" - lawyers throughout the state rated the best in their fields. In 2010, Mark Davidson attained the highest number of votes in Business Law, earning him a spot in the Legal Elite Hall of Fame.

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Julia Ambrose was studying for one of her 3L exams when the news arrived that she had been accepted as a clerk for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. “That was pretty much it for the night,” Julia recalled. “There was no more studying for that exam.” The joy of being selected as a Supreme Court law clerk was sweetened by the symbolism of being a female attorney chosen by the first female Justice of the Supreme Court.

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In the field of communications and copyright law, David Kushner has established himself as a trusted counselor in every facet of the business. From the technical details of signal compression and propagation to the broader politics of copyright and communications regulation, David brings an unparalleled depth of knowledge to his practice. Equally comfortable in conversation with a company president or a broadcast engineer, David is able to serve as a comprehensive resource for clients.

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To hear Henry Frye tell it, North Carolina’s first African-American Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and first African-American state lawmaker elected since the 19th century might just as easily have been a dentist.

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Coe Ramsey majored in philosophy and attended law school at Wake Forest University. "My goal was to come out and to have some connection to broadcasting, some connec­tion to music because I liked the people," says Ramsey, who was known to study while DJing at nightclubs in law school. Upon graduation he considered moving to New York or Los Angeles but opted to go with Brooks Pierce for its com­munications practice.

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Environmental regulatory agencies are charged with weighing the country’s need for limited resources beside the country’s equally important commitment to sustaining an ecosystem. So when a company that depends on cultivating those resources has to appear before those agencies, it needs legal counsel with extensive, specific experience. PCS Phosphate turned to Brooks Pierce partner George House.

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At the start of every blockbuster technology or landmark non-profit is an individual with a new idea. Recognizing the importance of this group of entrepreneurs to the future economy of North Carolina, Patrick Johnson helped create the North Carolina Lawyers for Entrepreneurs Assistance Program (NC LEAP).

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Even now, with most of his career behind him and the acclaim of his peers as the state's best corporate trial lawyer, "I still get nervous before a trial. Once I open my mouth, I'm OK."